Shailly Agnihotri, J.D.
Board of Fellows
Shailly Agnihotri is the founder and Executive Director of The Restorative Center (TRC), a grassroots organization which advances and advocates for Restorative Justice to address profound issues of social disconnect. She spent more than 20 years as an attorney and has developed an expertise in criminal justice through working as a prosecutor (Orleans Parish), teaching (Georgetown Law School, Southern University Law Center) and as a public defender (New York City). Shailly has presented at conferences and universities around the world on her vision for an independent, free-standing model for Restorative Justice. She has two children who never cease to dazzle her.
Bio
Anamika Barman-Adhikari, Ph.D.
Board of Fellows
Anamika Barman-Adhikari, PhD, is an associate professor of social work at the University of Denver. Her experiences in research, policy and clinical services have coalesced in her current scholarly goals and agenda. These experiences have collectively helped her to formulate an academic agenda, which is devoted to the prevention of HIV and substance use among high-risk youth and other vulnerable populations. Barman-Adhikari’s research interests are broadly centered on understanding the social-contextual determinants of risk and protective behaviors among vulnerable populations, such as young people experiencing homelessness. Her research broadly has four core foci: 1) Survey-based research examining how face-to-face social networks and norms shape the risk and protective behaviors of marginalized populations such as young people experiencing homelessness 2) Understanding digital practices among homeless and other minority youth and young adult populations 3) Developing and disseminating programs that utilize innovative technology to increase social connectedness and preventive behaviors in these populations 4) Using innovative observational and computational methods to evaluate interactions in both face-to-face and online social networks The goal of this research is to inform prevention interventions that acknowledge these contextual environments and utilize social network methodology to determine how these new ideas can be disseminated and sustained using a community-based participatory research approach.
Bio
Rob Benn-Frenette, O.N.B.
Secretary, Board of Directors
Rob Benn-Frenette joins Time For Homes out of a passion to build safer more equitable communities. Mr. Benn-Frenette is the co-founder of BullyingCanada—Canada’s premier national anti-bullying charity. Since he was 17 years old, he has led BullyingCanada’s team from two people to the current roster of more than four hundred highly-trained volunteers who provide 24/7/365 support to bullied youth. Born with cerebral palsy, his unusual walk made him the target of relentless torment throughout his school years. He experienced psychological and physical abuse – including being kicked, tripped, shoved, spit on, called names, being burned with a cigarette lighter and thrown in front of a moving bus. The relentless bullying left him with unable to concentrate on his school work, and with nightmares, night sweats and panic attacks. He tried to end his life twice. He reached out for help, but found no solace in anonymous, one-time telephone counselling. Instead of being crushed, he summoned internal strength. Wanting no other child to go through what he experienced, he partnered with then 14-year-old Katie Neu, who was also a victim of bullying. Together, they launched a website that gave birth to a national youth-created support service that would take support to lengths that made Canadian history. At age 22, Rob was awarded the honour of Member in the Order of New Brunswick. At BullyingCanada, he alternately answers calls for help, recruits and trains volunteers, delivers school presentations, and manages all daily administrative and fundraising duties. Building on that, Mr.Benn-Frenette is helping to lead Time For Homes—continuing his lifelong advocacy for those without a sufficient voice.
Bio
David Bieri, Ph.D.
Board of Fellows
Dr. David Bieri is Associate Professor of Urban Affairs and Associate Professor of Economics at Virginia Tech. Bieri’s current research examines “money and the metropolis”, focusing on the joint evolutionary dynamics of urbanization and the development of the monetary–financial system. He also writes about regulatory aspects of international finance, global monetary governance, and the history of economic thought. Prior to his work in the academy, Bieri held various senior positions at the Bank for International Settlements (BIS) in Basel, Switzerland and also worked as a high-yield analyst at Bankers Trust in London and in fixed-income syndication at UBS in Zürich. A Swiss native, he enjoys living in the Blue Ridge Mountains with his two daughters.
Bio
Dan Bodner
Board of Advisors
Dan Bodner is the founder QuickHaven Inc. Dan began working on the QuickHaven concept in 2017, inspired to act by the growth of tent encampments along his daily commute. The daily scene of hopelessness motivated him to begin researching materials, sketching designs, and experimenting with connectors and metals, slowly forming the QuickHaven concept and culminating in a ¾ scale corner section mockup he completed in the summer of 2019. The mockup convinced him that the concept was viable, and he then began recruiting the team and building the company. Dan has a master’s degree focused on numerical analysis and simulation in Hydrogeology from the University of Texas at Austin, where he studied under a University Fellowship; and he has a Liberal Arts degree from Vassar College. He has been in C level leadership roles for the past 30 years. He is also the creator of the FidoHand prosthesis. Early on Dan worked in construction and as an Architectural draftsman. He is a home-renovation hobbyist with skills in most of the building trades.
Bio
Elizabeth Bowen, Ph.D.
Board of Fellows
Elizabeth Bowen, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in the University at Buffalo School of Social Work. Her research focuses on health disparities affecting persons experiencing homelessness, housing as a social determinant of health, and social policy analysis. Bowen co-developed an original framework for trauma-informed policy analysis and has published widely in journals including American Journal of Public Health, International Journal of Drug Policy, and Public Health Nutrition. Bowen is a liaison with the National Homelessness Social Work Initiative and co-leads the Qualitative Social Work Research Special Interest Group for the Society for Social Work and Research. She received her PhD from the Jane Addams College of Social Work at the University of Illinois at Chicago and previously worked as a social worker managing supporting housing programs for people affected by homelessness, HIV/AIDS, and other health issues.
Bio
Katherine Briar-Lawson, Ph.D.
Board of Fellows
Katharine Briar-Lawson is a national expert on family focused practice and child and family policy. Among her books (co-authored) are Family-Centered Policies & Practices: International Implications (2001), and (co-edited) Innovative Practices with Vulnerable Children and Families (2001), Evaluation Research in Child Welfare (2002), Charting the Impacts of University-Child Welfare Collaboration (2003), Social Work Research (2010), Social Work Practice Research (2010), and Globalization, Social Justice and the Helping Professions (2011), and The Children’s Bureau: Shaping a century of child welfare practices, programs and policies. She chaired the Gerontological Task Force for the National Association for Deans and Directors and served as a past president. In addition, for 10 years she served as a Co-PI of the National Child Welfare Workforce Institute and currently collaborates with its Leadership Academy for Deans and Directors and its National Advisory Board.
Bio
Daniel Brisson, Ph.D.
Board of Fellows
Dr. Daniel Brisson is a Professor, and the Director of the Center for Housing and Homelessness Research (CHHR), at the Graduate School of Social Work University of Denver. Dr. Brisson’s scholarship focuses on poverty, low-income neighborhoods, affordable housing, and homelessness. Dr. Brisson has ongoing community partnerships with Mercy Housing, Denver Human Services, the Barton Institute and many others. Dr. Brisson is also delivering his intervention, Your Family, Your Neighborhood, to families living in low-income urban neighborhoods. Dr. Brisson has written extensively on the role of neighborhood social cohesion as a mediator for the health and well-being of families living in low-income neighborhoods. Currently, he is focusing on community partnerships with affordable housing providers to understand the role of neighborhood social processes on individual health and well-being. Dr. Brisson teaches research methods, statistics, and macro social work practice approaches to community development with a focus on poverty alleviation.
Bio
Barbara Brush, Ph.D.
Board of Fellows
Dr. Barbara L. Brush is a Professor in the Schools of Nursing and Public Health at the University of Michigan School of Nursing, a Board Member of the Detroit Urban Community-Academic Research Center, past faculty Director of the Public Partners and Community-Based Organization section of the Michigan Institute of Health and Clinical Research, and an Associate Director of the National Clinician Scholars Program. Her research with homeless families in Detroit uses a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach in designing, implementing, and evaluating best practice models to provide needed health and social services and inform health policy decisions that influence resource allocation to this underserved cohort. Current research is testing the use of narrative and life story mapping to facilitate disclosure of intra-personal violence (IPV), known to be highly prevalent in homeless women and to help women recognize and interpret IPV experiences and seek the help needed to improve health and social well-being. She has published extensively in the area of participatory approaches and homeless populations and, between 2016-2018, served on a National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine committee examining evidence linking health and permanent supportive housing (PSH) in persons experiencing homelessness across the country. Dr. Brush is also Co-Principal Investigator of a 5-year NIH-funded study (RO1NR016123-01A1) that is developing and testing an instrument to measure success in long-standing community-academic research partnerships. Dr. Brush received her baccalaureate in nursing from the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth and her master’s and PhD from the University of Pennsylvania.
Bio
Fianko Buckle
Program Associate, Data for Good
Fianko Buckle is a sophomore at Harvard University studying Computer Science, Statistics, and Sociology. He is a lover of all things tech, and has worked as a software engineering intern at Facebook and a few tech startups. His primary interests lie in the fields of Emerging Technologies, Entrepreneurship, Social Impact, and Investing. Fianko is particularly interested in using technology for social impact and restorative justice.
Bio
Courtney Cronley, Ph.D.
Board of Fellows
Dr. Courtney Cronley is an Associate Professor in the University of Tennessee, Knoxville College of Social Work. Her research centers on the impact of trauma in the lives of women experiencing homelessness, health disparities, and changing the built environment to promote better outcomes for individuals experiencing homelessness. She received her PhD from the UTK College of Social Work in 2009, completed a postdoctoral fellowship at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, and then earned tenure at The University of Texas at Arlington. She has nearly 10 years of experience teaching doctoral statistics and research methods courses and has received federal and state funding to research women’s experiences of homelessness, testing interventions to promote child health and well-being in shelters, transportation equity planning, and access to opportunities. Currently she is an associate professor in the University of Tennessee College of Social Work and faculty representative for the National Center for Excellence in Homeless Services.
Bio
Casey Dawkins, Ph.D.
Board of Fellows
Dr. Casey Dawkins is a Professor of Urban Studies and Planning, Director of the Urban Studies and Planning and Urban and Regional Planning and Design Programs, and a Research Associate at the National Center for Smart Growth at the University of Maryland, College Park. Prior to joining the University of Maryland, Dr. Dawkins was an Associate Professor of Urban Affairs and Planning, Director of the Metropolitan Institute, Director of the Center for Housing Research, and Editor of the journal Housing Policy Debate at Virginia Tech. Dr. Dawkins’ current research focuses on housing justice; U.S. housing policy evaluation; metropolitan housing market dynamics; the causes, consequences, and measurement of residential segregation by race and income; and the link between land use regulations and housing affordability. He has written two books and over 50 refereed journal articles and book chapters on these topics. Dr. Dawkins was co-guest editor of two special issues of the journal Urban Geography and currently serves on the editorial advisory boards of the Journal of the American Planning Association and Housing Policy Debate. Dr. Dawkins’ research has been supported by funding from a variety of organizations, including the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. General Services Administration, Fannie Mae Foundation, Brookings Institution, National Association of Realtors, Center for Housing Policy, Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, and several other governmental, private, and nonprofit organizations within Virginia, Maryland, and the District of Columbia. Casey Dawkins received his Ph.D. in City and Regional Planning from Georgia Tech in 2003.
Bio
Malachi Demmin, M.S.
Vice-President, Board of Directors
Malachi, a former Eagle Scout hailing from greater Los Angeles, holds a bachelor’s degree in Applied Mathematics with a focus on Statistics and Modeling from California Polytechnic State University Pomona and a Master of Science in Applied Mathematics from Rensselaer Polytechnic University. Currently, he is pursuing a doctorate in Mathematics from Rensselaer Polytechnic University. His Ph.D. thesis continues his focus on statistics and modeling with an emphasis on data, optimization, and partial differential equations. Malachi is excited to bring his modeling and data analytics experience to our partners and our work in combating homelessness. During his limited downtime, Malachi enjoys gaming, writing, reading, running, swimming, and weightlifting.
Bio
Vincent Doto, J.D.
Board of Advisors
Vincent Doto, J.D. is the Director of the Columbia County (NY) Probation Department. Director Doto has 30 years of experience working with individuals accessing services in the community from the Department of Social Services and the Probation Department. He is the current Regional Representative of Region 2 for the American Probation and Parole Association and sits on the Executive Board of Directors for the NYS Council of Probation Administrators. Additionally he serves as a member of EXiT (Executives Transforming Probation and Parole) and as a board member of several local non-profit organizations that serve individuals with mental health, substance abuse and housing issues. Homelessness and affordable housing issues are a major problem in the area he serves and he is dedicated to help provide solutions to address these needs.
Bio
Amy Dworsky, Ph.D.
Board of Fellows
Dr. Amy Dworsky is a Research Fellow at Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago. Her research focuses on vulnerable youth populations–including youth aging out of foster care, youth experiencing homelessness, and youth in foster care who are pregnant or parenting–and the systems in which those youth are involved. Dworsky has experience using both quantitative and qualitative research methods, analyzing administrative data, and partnering with public and nonprofit agencies to conduct policy and practice relevant research. Dworsky is a nationally recognized expert on homelessness among young people who have experienced foster care. She was the PI on the HUD-funded study of housing options for youth aging out of foster care and a Co-investigator for Voices of Youth Count, a national research and policy initiative focused on youth homelessness in the U.S. She is currently working with Chicago’s Continuum of Care to improve the provision of services to youth experiencing homelessness, with colleagues at the Urban Institute on a study of how communities are using the Family Unification Program (FUP) – Family Self Sufficiency (FSS) demonstration to serve youth at risk for homelessness who were formerly in foster care, and with colleagues at Chapin Hall on a HUD funded study of how administrative data can used to estimate the prevalence of youth homelessness. Dworsky has a PhD in Social Welfare from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, a Master of Social Work from Syracuse University, and a Bachelor of Arts from Williams College.
Bio
Caden Felton
Program Associate, Data for Good
Caden is from Atlanta, GA, and is currently studying Computer Science at Vanderbilt University. With previous work for tech companies and service organizations, he hopes to work for/build organizations that aim to alleviate sticky, real-world issues. Caden sees the potential that improved data has to scale effective interventions to homelessness, and he’s excited to work with Time for Homes on their Data for Good initiative.
Bio
Thalia González, J.D.
Board of Fellows
Professor Thalia González is a nationally recognized expert in the field of restorative justice. Her primary research field focuses on theories and practices of restorative justice. To investigate questions in this area, Professor González applies a broad range of research methods from legal theory development to empirical analysis. A core theme within her portfolio of work is the examination of how restorative justice operates within law and public systems to remedy disproportionality, structural inequality, and systemic harm. Her secondary research fields include juvenile justice, race, gender, and inequality, public interest legal practice, domestic human rights, and norm theory. As a scholar and practitioner, Professor González works closely with practitioners, researchers, and policymakers with a specific focus on system change and policy development. She also advises and supports a number of projects and programs using restorative approaches in public and political systems, as well as community-based settings. Her research is regularly utilized by educators, policymakers, county safety councils, think tanks, and bar associations. She currently holds an appointment as a Senior Scholar in the Center on Poverty and Inequality at Georgetown University Law Center where she leads national research on restorative justice. Professor González is a frequent expert speaker at conferences and public commentator on legal and policy issues. She has been an external reviewer for the Department of Justice, national foundations, and numerous high impact journals. Professor González has also served as an evaluator for the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and consultant for the National Institute of Justice. Presently, she sits on the Advisory Committee for the Restorative Justice Research Institute and the Advisory Board for the Restorative Justice Center at the University of San Diego. Professor González has been a scholar in residence at Berkeley Law, UCLA School of Law, and Georgetown University Law Center. Prior to joining the faculty at Occidental College she was a practicing attorney and held appointments at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law and Arizona State University. Professor González has been recognized for her excellence in teaching at Occidental College, including being awarded the Linda and Todd White Teaching Prize, the Loftgordon Teaching Award, and selected as a Mortar Board Last Lecture speaker.
Bio
Meredith Greif, Ph.D.
Board of Fellows
Meredith’s research focuses on homelessness, housing insecurity, homeownership, and neighborhood effects, both internationally and domestically. She is currently study how landlords’ business practices contribute to housing outcomes among lower-income and formerly homeless individuals, and explore models of stable, supportive housing for formerly homeless individuals. Her research also addresses how neighborhood and housing outcomes vary across racial and ethnic groups, and how they perpetuate intergroup inequalities.
Bio
Sharon Gutman, Ph.D.
Board of Fellows
Dr. Sharon A. Gutman is a professor at Columbia University Medical Center where she teaches and conducts research in the Programs in Occupational Therapy. Dr. Gutman is also the program director of Columbia’s Post-Professional Occupational Therapy Clinical Doctoral Program. She has been an occupational therapist for nearly 30 years and has spent her career working with marginalized populations with mental health and substance use conditions. In the past years she has primarily worked with sheltered adults with mental health concerns needing the daily life skills to transition from chronic homelessness to supported housing.
Bio
Benjamin Henwood, Ph.D.
Board of Fellows
Benjamin Henwood, PhD, LCSW, is a recognized expert in health and housing services research whose work connects clinical interventions with social policy. Dr. Henwood has specific expertise in improving care for adults experiencing homelessness and serious mental illness, as well as in the integration of primary and behavioral health care. His research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health (including the National Institute of Mental Health, National Institute on Drug Abuse, and National Institute on Aging). He is a co-author of a book on Housing First published by Oxford University Press, and is the co-lead the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare’s Grand Challenge to End Homelessness. Dr. Henwood is currently an Associate Professor at the University of Southern California Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work.
Bio
Brittany Hill
Board of Advisors
Brittany Hill is the CEO and Founder of Accelerist, the partnership intelligence SaaS platform where some of the industry’s most prolific brands and nonprofits prospect, value, access and measure their events and partnerships with each other. As a passionate data seeker and trend translator, Brittany specializes in using analytics and innovations to support B-corporations and Fortune 1000 companies as well as enterprise and federated nonprofits in their pursuit of sustainable events and partnerships. In her role, Brittany spearheads social impact product development and leads a talented team who has supported 100s of customers in effectuating social change. Brittany holds over 15 years of experience in the entertainment, nonprofit and agency sectors, with a consistent specialization and commitment to purpose-driven work. Throughout her career, Mrs. Hill’s portfolio of work ranges from building multi-channel partnerships and award-winning campaigns between blue-chip nonprofits and companies, to helping entertainers and celebrities find their social purpose, and producing social activism events. Brittany’s trendsetting insights have been featured in Forbes, Huffington Post, TIME, and MSN.com. She is a seasoned and sought-after speaker on the topics of data-driven cause partnerships, social impact measurement, industry trends, sponsorship valuation and cause partnership sales, with previous engagements at BBCON, Sustainable Brands, SXSW, Association of Fundraising Professionals and Engage for Good.
Bio
Ella Howard, Ph.D.
Board of Fellows
Ella is an Associate Professor of History at Wentworth Institute of Technology in Boston, where she teaches urban history, digital history, and public history. She is currently studying the roles of historic preservation in the development of American cities during the 20th century.
Bio
Stephen Koester, Ph.D.
Board of Fellows
Stephen Koester, PhD., is a recently retired as a professor of Anthropology at the University of Colorado Denver. Dr. Koester (Steve) has been working with marginalized populations on issues of social justice since obtaining his PhD from the University of Colorado Boulder. He began his career examining the impact of development projects on small farmers and fishing communities in the Caribbean. With the advent of the HIV/AIDS epidemic he shifted his primary focus to medical anthropology and turned his attention to marginalized populations in the United States working primarily in urban environments with people who use drugs and people experiencing homelessness. Dr. Koester employs a critical medical anthropological perspective and uses ethnographic and complimentary qualitative methods to examine the contextual dimensions of people’s lives and the conditions that compromise their health. He frequently collaborates on mixed methods studies as well. His work has led to the identification of previously unrecognized modes of HIV and hepatitis C transmission, and studies demonstrating how the criminalization of drug use and homelessness exacerbates, and in fact, produces harm. Steve has been a Fulbright scholar in St. Lucia and Vietnam. In 2001 he was a visiting behavioral scientist at the Viral Hepatitis Division of the Centers for Disease Control. He has been the principal investigator of an NIH R0 1, and co-PI and co-investigator on several others. He has consulted with the CDC, Family Health International, the FAO, the Ford Foundation and several state and municipal health departments. Although retired from teaching he is actively pursuing research and recently provided an affidavit in support of Denver Homeless Outloud, a grassroots homeless coalition pressing the city and state for housing and the decriminalization of homelessness.
Bio
Heather Larkin, Ph.D.
Board of Fellows
Heather has researched prevalence of adverse childhood experiences (ACE) and service use among homeless people and co-developed the Restorative Integral Support (RIS) model with John Records. Heather co-leads ACE Think Tank and Action Team meetings and works closely with local service agency directors to strengthen an ACE response that builds community resilience and advances equitable policies.
Bio
Antoine Lovell, Ph.D.
Board of Fellows
Antoine Lovell, LMSW, MPA is a doctoral candidate at Fordham University Graduate School of Social Service with a concentration in social policy. Antoine has been appointed to teach social policy at a number of colleges/universities, including Columbia University School of Social Work, Tulane University School of Social Work, Silberman School of Social Work at Hunter College, Molloy College School of Social Work, Rutgers University School of Social Work, and Fordham University Graduate School of Social Work. Most recently, Antoine was the director of a supportive housing division for a large child welfare organization that served runaway- homeless youth, along with youth in foster care. Antoine’s other professional experience includes work with State and City legislatures, advocacy on behalf of the homeless, workforce development, preservation of affordable housing, and program evaluation. Antoine’s primary research interests are policy implementation, diversity in organizations, qualitative research methods, critical theory, youth development, homelessness, housing, race and racism, poverty, along with social/public policy and their impact on people of African descent. Antoine received a BA in sociology with a minor in Black and Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter College, City University of New York, an MPA from Long Island University, School of Business, Public Administration and Information Sciences and an MSW from New York University, Silver School of Social Work in Clinical Social Work. Antoine has also attended Cornell University, School of Industrial and Labor Relations for diversity management. In 2017, Antoine was awarded a competitive public policy fellowship from the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM).
Bio
Peter Marcuse, Ph.D.
Board of Fellows
Peter Marcuse is Emeritus Professor of Urban Planning at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation. He has written extensively in English as well as German, in the US, the UK, and various other European countries. His work has also appeared in newspaper and magazines such as the Nation, New York Newsday, Monthly Review, Shelterforce, and many others.
Bio
Andrea Maurizio
Board of Advisors
Andrea Maurizio works towards advancing technological innovation and solutions within the healthcare sector. Andrea helps serve as a creative connector bridging the gap between strategy & execution. Andrea has a master's degree in Industrial-Organizational Psychology from New York University. In her spare time, Andrea has spent decades working on social justice and community-building initiatives. Andrea has worked to alleviate food insecurity and housing insecurity in programs across the country; most recently serving on the Associate Board of the Bowery Mission and as Director of the Martin Bancroft Community Dinner program. Andrea is excited to help bring research-informed strategies into policy and housing assistance operations. She is dedicated to ensuring that each community member is seen, valued, and integrated into the community.
Bio
Lorena Mongelli
Board of Advisors
Lorena Mongelli is a reporter at the New York Post who has proudly covered some of the biggest news events in our nation’s history, including wrongful police deaths, immigration rallies, gay rights demonstrations, and Black Lives Matter protests. As a community servant, her passion is telling meaningful stories that help create change. Most recently, she has been covering the pandemic, the spike in crime and homelessness in New York City.
Bio
Marian Moser Jones, Ph.D.
Board of Fellows
Marian Moser Jones is an Associate Professor and Graduate Director in the Department of Family Science at the University of Maryland School of Public Health in College Park, MD. She teaches graduate and undergraduate courses on the history of public health maternal and child health, and the human services. Her research examines the institutionalization of benevolence in the United States through an historical and ethical lens. She is the author of numerous peer-reviewed articles that place homelessness, maternal and child health, and other topics in historical, ethical, and social context; as well as the book, The American Red Cross from Clara Barton to the New Deal (Johns Hopkins, 2012). Jones was a 2010-2011 De Witt Stetten postdoctoral fellow at the National Institutes of Health, received her Ph.D. and M.P.H. degrees in Sociomedical Sciences from Columbia University, and received her A.B. from Harvard College.
Bio
Trudie Porter Biggers
Grant Specialist
Trudie lives in Montana and has been writing and managing grants since 2015. Following a brief experience with homelessness, Trudie seeks to affect a paradigm shift in how society views the homeless. She shares the Time For Homes goal to provide housing-first and writes about her experience and others' experiences with depth and emotion. Over the years, Trudie and her husband have often opened their home to people with nowhere else to go. Following a loved one's death, Trudie was influential in passing updated anti-stalking legislation in Utah and Nevada. She recently published a book about homesteading the area of Southeast Montana known as The Huntley Irrigation Project. Trudie is a contributor to the Montana Memory Project and the Digital Public Library of America.
Bio
Pat Precin, Ph.D.
Board of Fellows
Patricia Precin, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is an occupational therapist and a psychoanalyst at Columbia University. Pat has provided services to sheltered adults for several decades.
Bio
Phillip Raub
Board of Advisors
After leading at the likes of Nest, Nintendo and Gap, Phillip Raub co-founded b8ta, the software-powered retailer and SaaS maker that helps bring brands to life in engaging, discovery-oriented ways. After growing b8ta into a global brand, Phillip recently joined Model No. as the CEO. Model No. is the first on-demand home furnishing brand using 3D printing and automation to develop customizable, artfully designed and sustainable furniture.
Bio
Harmony Rhoades, Ph.D.
Board of Fellows
Harmony Rhoades, PhD, is a Research Associate Professor at the USC Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work and the Associate Director of the USC Center for LGBT Health Equity. Dr. Rhoades holds an M.S. in Epidemiology and a Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of California, Los Angeles, and completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Southern California. Her research focuses on understanding behavioral health, mental health, and substance use outcomes among persons experiencing homelessness, sexual and gender minority populations, those living with HIV/AIDS, and those with serious mental illness.
Bio
Brandon Robinson, Ph.D.
Board of Fellows
Brandon Andrew Robinson is Assistant Professor of Gender and Sexuality Studies at the University of California, Riverside. Brandon’s book Coming Out to the Streets: LGBTQ Youth Experiencing Homelessness examines the LGBTQ youth’s lives before they experience homelessness—within their families, schools, and other institutions—and later when they navigate the streets, deal with police, and access shelters and other services. Brandon’s work on homelessness has also been published in Gender & Society, Journal of Marriage & Family, and Child Welfare. All this work pushes people who want to address homelessness to move beyond blaming families rejecting their child as the cause of LGBTQ youth homelessness and to instead start dealing with systemic problems that are at the root of homelessness.
Bio
Reagan Rodriguez
Board of Advisors
Reagan Rodriguez is a Futurist and Founder of Worthy Domes. Rodriguez is also an iconoclast known as a cultural pioneer for his integration of creativity and spirituality. He is organizing a global consultation on the role of wealth creation for holistic transformation through his Insider Circle…a highly effective network of Givers. Together, we have the unique opportunity to bring hope, housing and micro-financing to a world in desperate need, and we can start today by mobilizing the resources in our hands. WORTHYdomes serves to build communities, and together, may we be the hands and feet to those in need here at home and around the world. There will be a day-in our lifetime-when we get to celebrate every person on the planet for having sustainable shelter, and access to clean water. ‍ Applying this value to both business and philanthropy, he is the founder of the Rodriguez Stewardship Foundation which supports homelessness and educational causes for children with autism and special needs. He is a motivational speaker and practical life skills coach for the homeless and children with autism. ‍ Reagan and his wife Abigail currently split their residences between Miami, Florida and Serenbe.
Bio
Deden Rukmana, Ph.D.
Board of Fellows
Dr. Deden Rukmana is professor and the chairperson of the Department of Community and Regional Planning at Alabama A&M University in Huntsville, Alabama. He received a PhD degree in Urban and Regional Planning from Florida State University and completed master’s degrees from the University of Southern California as well as Bandung Institute of Technology. He had served as an elected member of the Governing Board of the ACSP (2013-2015) and a Director at Large of the Georgia Planning Association (2015-2018). His research centers on health disparities and homelessness in the US, and spatial planning and development challenges in Indonesia. His homelessness research focuses on homelessness prevention programs and spatial analysis of intracity homelessness data. His work appears in journals such as Housing Policy Debate, Journal of Planning Education and Research, Children and Youth Services Review, and International Planning Studies. He is also the editor of The Routledge Handbook of Planning Megacities in the Global South (2020). His research has been supported by the National Science Foundation, National Institute of Health, and US Department of Homeland Security. His works have been cited by many media including AFP, Public Radio International, Straits Times (Singapore), Jakarta Post and Kompas (Indonesia), Diplomat (Australia), El Pais (Mexico), and Nikkei Asian Review (Japan).
Bio
James Ryan
President, Board of Directors
James, a native of New York, continues his career in nonprofit management by leading the Time For Homes charge with a background in communications, development, management, and oversight. James has extensive experience working with nonprofit organizations across North America and Europe in areas as varied as anti-bullying and human rights to nuclear nonproliferation and combating human trafficking. Before embarking on a rewarding career in nonprofit administration, James enjoyed serving as a six sigma, operations, and marketing manager for various Marriott International brands. When he isn’t actively trying to make the world a better place, he can be found with family, friends, and his dog. James is a voracious reader, avid traveler, fledgling writer, daily bicyclist, and occasional hiker.
Bio
Michael Saccoman
Board of Advisors
Michael Saccoman is the Community Liaison for Assemblymember John McDonald with the 108th Assembly District. He is a graduate from the University of Albany, SUNY, with a Bachelor’s Degree in the American Political Science Honors Program. A resident of the City of Albany, Michael is an active participant in many community organizations across the Capital Region. Especially, as a member of the City of Albany Poverty Reduction Initiative, (CAPRI) he is witness to the devastation that homelessness and poverty dawns on our community. As a civil servant, he strives lend a helping hand to ending poverty and homelessness. He is eager to contribute to the mission of Time for Homes.
Bio
Tom Sanchez, Ph.D.
Board of Fellows
Tom Sanchez earned his PhD in City Planning from Georgia Tech and is a Professor of Urban Affairs and Planning at Virginia Tech in the National Capital Region (Washington, DC/Northern Virginia). Sanchez is editor-in-chief of Housing Policy Debate, an international journal on the topics of housing and community development policy. He conducts research in the areas of transportation, housing, social justice, technology, and scholarly impact. His recent book, Planning Knowledge and Research, was published by Routledge in 2018. He has co-authored three other books including, Planning as if People Matter: Governing for Social Equity (2012), The Right to Transportation: Moving to Equity (2007), and The Social Impacts of Urban Containment (2007). His forthcoming book (with Denise Bedford), Networks in the Knowledge Economy, is due out in early 2021.
Bio
Rachel Sandowski, M.S.W.
Director of Programs
Rachel is a New York native who currently resides in Philly. Rachel holds a Master’s Degree in Social Work from Stony Brook University School of Social Welfare with a concentration in Integrated Health. Rachel is extremely passionate about adequate healthcare, housing, social justice, and all-around change. Rachel has worked with many age groups and populations throughout her Social Work career and is thrilled to be a part of Time For Homes. Rachel is also an EMT and her favorite thing about being a first responder is all the incredible people she gets to meet and help. Rachel is very goofy and will never miss a chance to send a corny joke your way. In her spare time, Rachel loves to eat shawarma, travel all over the world, make people laugh, read books (she worked at a library for a long time!), go camping, and do basically anything outdoors with her partner and very cute dog named Cody.
Bio
Mara Schiff, Ph.D.
Board of Fellows
Dr. Mara Schiff has been a restorative justice scholar, practitioner, speaker and advocate for nearly 30 years. She is currently an Associate Professor in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Florida Atlantic University (FAU),Vice-President of the National Association for Community and Restorative Justice (NACRJ), President of PeaceWorks Consulting, Inc, and a publicly elected member and currently Vice -Chairwoman of the School Board of the School District of Indian River County Schools, Florida. Dr. Schiff earned her Ph.D. in Public Administration from New York University on a full Merit Scholarship, after earnign her Bachelor’s degree from Clark University. Before moving into academia, she served as Research Director for the New York City Office of the Deputy Mayor for Public Safety, and worked in various public and non-profit agencies in New York City focused on criminal justice, juvenile justice and child welfare. Her academic work examines restorative philosophy and practice in criminal-legal, juvenile, and educational arenas, and explores whether or how restorative approaches might overcome systemic, institutionalized forms of racism, exclusion, marginalization and injustice. Dr. Schiff teaches both graduate and undergraduate courses in Restorative Justice, Crime in Schools, Ethics for the Justice System, and various other courses. She also serves on the Executive Administrative Committee for Florida Atlantic University’s Peace, Justice and Human Rights Initiative. In 2019, Dr. Schiff received the FAU Presidential Award for Outstanding Faculty-Led Community Engagement in Teaching, and was first runner-up for First Runner-Up for FAU’s Presidential Award for Outstanding Faculty-Led Community Engagement in Service. In 2015 she received NACRJ’s award for Dedicated Service Recognition, and in 2010 she was the recipient of FAU’s Presidential Leadership Award. Dr. Schiff has authored mutiple books, book chapters and articles in academic journals such as Contemporary Justice Review, Crimal Justice and Behavior, Washington University Journal of Law and Policy, and Criminal Justice Review. She has received evaluation and training grants from the National Institute of Justice, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and other national and local organizations. Dr. Schiff speaks and trains nationally and internationally on restorative and racial (in)justice in justice, education, and community settings. She works with school districts implementing restorative strategies to shift disciplinary policy, climate and culture, and has trained teachers, administrators, staff, school resource officers and others in restorative justice strategies. She has served as a consultant for the National Center of Juvenile and Family Court Judges (NCJFCJ) the School-Justice Partnership Project, the Federal Department of Education’s Rethinking Discipline, and been an invited speaker at national and international events such as Closing the School Discipline Gap in Washington DC, the New York State Permanent Commission on Justice for Children’s School-Justice Partnership Summit in New York City, the National Leadership Summit on School Justice Partnership in Washington, DC, the First and Second International Symposiums on Restorative Justice held in Skopelos, Greece, First International Conference on Child Justice and Children’s Rights, Pretoria, South Africa.
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Mehul Shetty
Program Coordinator, Data for Good
Mehul is studying Computer Science and Data Science at Marist College in Poughkeepsie, NY. With a constant desire to create social change, he has helped a number of non-profits before volunteering at Time For Homes. At Time For Homes, Mehul coordinates between our Data For Good program head and the various organizations that use our data to help the homeless population. In his free time, Mehul enjoys hiking, playing around with some code on his computer, and writing songs.
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Duncan Sill
Board of Advisors
Duncan’s outcast lens weaves uncanny stories into filmmaking to address how humanity reconciles with our chaotic, often incomprehensible, divisive world. He is the director and producer of thecharacter-driven documentary titled “One Paycheck Away” (currently in development) focusing on the hardworking Americans who are living through the tumultuous transition from a stable working and middle class existence to one that is barely surviving. One Paycheck Away is not another top down approach documentary; rather, it is the true stories of individuals, families, and communities struggling to for workable solutions in a world increasingly hampered by the status quo. A NYU graduate, Duncan has been involved in the film industry since 2007 with film program,policies, tax incentives and film studio development. Some of his film projects include: Somebody Next Door (Director/Producer), Homeless Ashes (Executive Producer), Drunktown’s Finest(Executive Producer, Sundance Selection, Robert Redford, Executive Producer).With extensive economic, natural resources and community development experience, he brings a unique, raw POV and access to merge disparate disciplines into potential call to action that comes from within the deep spaces of characters and places. Duncan has been involved with hands-on strategic, economic and community development for many years. While serving in various positions with government and private entities, he was instrumental in active participation to establish initiatives and resources to support a myriad of community and regional infrastructure development, including activities and project management related to affordable housing, sustainable agriculture, food systems enhancements, renewable energy, broadband telecom solutions, media and film industry, water resources and conservation.
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Cynthia Spence, Ph.D.
Board of Fellows
Dr. Cynthia Neal Spence is an associate professor of sociology at Spelman College. Her teaching and research interests in the areas of sociology, criminology, law and violence against women support the Law and Criminology concentration in the College’s Department of Sociology. Dr. Spence’s interest in issues of higher education access, gender role socialization and violence against women frame her research, writing, community service involvement and public speaking. She has served as a consultant for the Ford Foundation Institutional Transformation Project, the University of Chicago Provost Initiative on Minority Affairs, the Agnes Scott College Center for Teaching and Learning and the Georgia Department of Corrections. In addition to her faculty position at Spelman, Dr. Spence serves as director of the UNCF Mellon Programs. The Mellon Programs provide fellowships for students interested in becoming college professors in the areas of the humanities, physics, mathematics, sociology, anthropology and other disciplines employing philosophical or historical analysis. Dr. Spence is the recipient of the Spelman College Alumnae Achievement Tiffany Award and the Fannie Lou Hammer Community Service Award. She currently serves on the Board of Directors for the Washington Internship Institute.
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Adam Stojanovski
Associate Director
Adam, a native of Western New York, holds a bachelor’s degree in American Political Science from the University at Albany. Adam has a vast experience working in the New York State Senate and Assembly. Through his previous work at the Legislature, he developed a prolific understanding of the importance of providing safe housing to the homeless. He looks forward to the opportunity to begin a career in the realm of nonprofit agencies. When he is not working, you will find him snowboarding, playing video games, re-watching The Office, and looking for the next travel adventure.
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Chip Sullivan
Board of Advisors
Mr. Sullivan leads strategy, development and public relations for the network and for Universal Television. Chip oversees publicity, talent relations, photography, events and awards campaigns, and is liaison to the larger NBCUniversal community, as well as their parent company Comcast. Chip came to NBC after more than twenty years at DreamWorks. As Head of Special Projects, he worked on award-winning films including “Saving Private Ryan,” “American Beauty,” “Gladiator,” “Shrek,” and TV series including “Spin City,” “Boomtown,” “Las Vegas,” and “Father of the Pride.” Following the studio’s IPO in 2004 and Paramount Pictures’ acquisition of DreamWorks in 2005, he oversaw corporate communications for both companies, working on films including “Sweeney Todd,” “Dreamgirls,” and “Transformers,” as well as TV series including “Into the West” and “On the Lot.” He also consulted on special marketing projects for films including “Kung Fu Panda” and “Madagascar.”After DreamWorks partnered with The Reliance Anil Dhirubhai Ambani Group in 2009, Chip contributed to “The Help,” “War Horse,” and “Lincoln,” and worked on campaigns for films including “The Croods” and “How to Train Your Dragon.” Prior to joining DreamWorks, Chip served as Director of Special Projects at Walt Disney Studios.Passionate about several philanthropic causes, Chip currently serves on the National Board for the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network (GLSEN) and the Advisory Board of the Los Angeles Sports & Entertainment Commission. He has also served on the boards of Project Angel Food and LifeWorks Mentoring. In addition, he serves as an advisor for Time For Homes and he works with the Motion Picture and Television Fund by designing their annual Evening Before the Emmys and Night Before the Oscars fundraisers, as well as with City Year by helping to spearhead their annual Spring Break fundraiser.
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Eddie Sundquist, J.D.
Board of Advisors
Mayor Eddie Sundquist is a proud graduate of Jamestown High School, having graduated salutatorian in 2007. He went on to pursue a political science degree at St. John Fisher College. The first in his family to graduate from college, Eddie earned his Bachelor of Arts degree, summa cum laude in 2010. Eager to do his part to help others, Eddie moved to Philadelphia, where he taught middle school science to students overlooked by the traditional education system. As an educator, he found that the only way to make a real change in society is to roll up your sleeves and get to work. Eddie became passionate about changing the life trajectory of kids, but he was determined to find a way to make a difference in society as well. While teaching, he attended the University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education. In 2012, he earned his Masters of Science in Education degree. As an advocate for science, technology and math education programs in schools, Eddie was recognized by his school as Educator of the Year in 2011, having introduced exploratory science labs in his classroom. Determined to come back home and continue fighting for others, Eddie returned to Western New York in 2012 when he was accepted into the University at Buffalo School of Law Program. While at UB Law School, Eddie was an advocate for children and families, working with the Buffalo community to develop alternatives to school suspension and discipline programs. In addition, he has an expansive background in legal studies, having interned with the U.S. Treasury Department and U.S Attorney’s Office, and clerked for an administrative law judge at the New York State Division of Human Rights. Eddie received his Juris Doctorate in 2015 from the University at Buffalo School of Law and returned to Jamestown to practice law with Lewis & Lewis, P.C. Eddie was elected the Mayor of the City of Jamestown in November of 2019 and took office at the City’s 25th Mayor in January of 2020.
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Dana Swope
Social Media Coordinator
Dana Swope hails from Omaha, Nebraska, and holds a Bachelor’s degree in Social Services Administration. In addition to owning a home and office organization service, Dana has worked for the YWCA as a domestic violence crisis counselor. Dana can often be found with her three children–and will likely be creating art, organizing and attending community events, or gardening. Dana joins Time For Homes to help ensure others don’t have to experience homelessness, as she did recently.
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Amanda Terrell, Ph.D.
Board of Fellows
Amanda Terrell is an Assistant Professor of Human Development and Family Science in the School of Human Environmental Sciences at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. She is the co-founder and co-director of AARRC – the Adolescent to Adult Risk and Resilience Co-Op. Her scholarly focus is interdisciplinary, mixed-method research on adolescent and emerging adult health and development in diverse contexts, with emphasis on families, communities, and digital landscapes. She has multiple publications focused on maternal homelessness, runaway youth homelessness, and the evolution of homelessness research since the 1970s. She serves on three youth-focused editorial boards and is a member of the National Council on Family Relations.
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Bryan Towey
Board of Advisors
Bryan is an entrepreneur and philanthropist based in New York, Switzerland, Amsterdam, and Bali. He is a real estate investor and developer with properties located around the world. He is also the founder and cofounder of numerous global brands. Through his humanitarian work, Bryan is improving the quality of life for the people of Africa, protecting the welfare of animals, and much more. Outside of work, Bryan loves to travel and surf. He can speak English, Dutch, German, French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish.
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Yvonne Vissing, Ph.D.
Board of Fellows
Yvonne Vissing, Ph.D., is Professor of Healthcare Studies and founding director of the Center for Childhood & Youth Studies at Salem State University in Massachusetts. A sociologist, she has published 8 books on community wellbeing, including Changing the Paradigm of Homelessness (Routledge 2020) and Out of Sight, Out of Mind: Homeless children and families in small town America (University of Kentucky Press). Dr. Vissing is the US child rights policy chair for the Hope for Children UN Convention on the Rights of the Child Policy Center in Cyprus. She is also on the Human Rights Council for the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), Steering Committee board member for Human Rights Educators HREUSA, and is a fellow at UCONN’s Dodd Center for Human Rights.
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Beryl Wajsman, B.C.L., LL.B.
Board of Advisors
Beryl Wajsman is editor-in-chief of The Suburban Newspaper Group – the second largest in Quebec – and founder and President of the Institute for Public Affairs of Montreal, a national advocacy organization. Beryl holds two law degrees from McGill University, and has spent over thirty years combining the worlds of politics, community activism and media. His long involvement in federal politics includes service as former Minister of Justice Irwin Cotler’s Executive Assistant when he was first elected as an MP. For three years he broadcast the critically acclaimed “Last Angry Man” radio newsmagazine on the Corus network and then hosted a weekly news hour CJAD. He has won many Quebec, Canadian and North American honours for his work including the Lindsay Crysler Award for oustanding achievement in journalism, the Charles Hawkins Memorial Trophy for Best National Editorial writing and placed first in the LMA North American competitions for Best Editorial Writing and and Best Opinion writing. Beryl is a recipient of the Martin Luther King Jr. Legacy Award for the promotion of human dignity, the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal for Community Service, the Order of Merit of the Republic of the Phillipines and a Parliamentary Certificate of Recognition for contributions to Canadian democracy. A regular commentator on television and radio, he has appeared on CNN, CTV, CBC, TVA, RDI, Global and Sun. His views and opinions have been published in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Jerusalem Post, Time magazine, The National Post, The Montreal Gazette, La Presse, Le Devoir and the bulletin of London’s International Institute of Strategic Studies.
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Ben Young
Board of Advisors
Ben, from Edmonton, has recently gotten himself out of homelessness and finds himself successful in his current life. Mr. Young feels the homeless are judged too often for their mistakes rather than being embraced for their potential. He’s taking first-hand experience with homelessness and is turning it into a platform to advocate for those currently unhoused––building a bridge between those that need help and those that want to help. Ben is excited to help Time For Homes put stories, experience, and faces to the datasets available.
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